Why is Biblical History Vital and Relevant to You? What does the Bible Say?

History is either of extreme value, or it is of no value at all.


We live in an era where history is often re-written for the purpose of achieving a personal or political agenda. Modern ideology tells us that the only thing we learn from history is that nothing can be learned from history. Those who hold to this viewpoint might simply say that history is random and unguided – just like evolution.


But the Christian worldview is quite the opposite. The Bible views all history through the eyes of God. All history, therefore, is HIS-story. Our God is the AUTHOR of all history. He has a plan   and He is working it… and He works through everyday people like you, your children, your family, and your church! God warned the people of Israel several times to never forget the history of God’s working in their lives - and to pass that history along to their children.


With this in mind, the foundation for our worldview of history is the Bible. Christianity is grounded upon the proposition that the Bible is the SUPERNATURAL source of all truth and knowledge; and as such, it is absolutely reliable as the basis for our worldview in every area of life. Therefore, it is vital that we come to absolutely trust in the reliability of Scripture.


In our Thinking Like a Christian Video Series, we investigate this principle and compare the reliability of the Bible alongside the most highly revered secular writings in the world. If you are wondering how the Bible holds up to the test, and what it says about history, you will enjoy the 2nd session of our video series titled “The Christian Worldview of History”. You can watch this Preview to get a taste!


Is our knowledge of history valuable and even vital? Yes! Can our knowledge of history protect us from repeating the same mistakes of generations past? Absolutely! Will that knowledge lead us to wiser choices for our future? You can count on it!


Yes. HIS-story is worthy of our study!

Images used under creative commons license – commercial use (10/11/2017) Brenda Clarke (Flickr)